Comedy

Showbiz

This is my review of Bossypants by Tina Fey, narrated by Tina Fey.

All right, yes, audiobooks are cheating. But Tina Fey’s a comedienne, so her narration is likely to be better than her prose, right?

Bossypants is a memoir of Tina Fey’s life and career (up until a few years ago). She starts off talking about her childhood and early career. This part was quite amusing, because she no doubt had several anecdotes to choose from, and it is evident from the narration that she is a very talented at comedy. One of my favourite quotes: “Now every girl is expected to have Caucasian blue eyes, full Spanish lips, a classic button nose, hairless Asian skin with a California tan, a Jamaican dance hall ass, long Swedish legs, small Japanese feet, the abs of a lesbian gym owner, the hips of a nine-year-old boy, the arms of Michelle Obama, and doll tits. The person closest to actually achieving this look is Kim Kardashian, who, as we know, was made by Russian scientists to sabotage our athletes.”

It’s nearly impossible to go wrong with topics like this. Nearly every girl has memories of awkward adolescence. And the terrible first job, where you’re simultaneously incompetent and also infinitely superior to your coworkers. It stops being relatable when she begins her stint at SNL, though. Instead of juicy showbiz tales, she focuses on her (in)famous role as Sarah Palin and walking the fine line between humour and mockery. The section on starting off 30Rock is also disappointing.

The best part about this book is the complete lack of preachy-advice-for-young women. Fey acknowledges her relatively privileged upbringing and television success without seeming self deprecating or resorting to false modesty. She is talented, definitely, and spent years honing her skills in touring improv groups before hitting the bigtime. Her family life is also refreshingly ordinary, and she expresses genuine appreciation and respect for many of her colleagues. All in all, this is a very readable book, unlike other certain other memoirs *cough*.

3/5 from me, listen to the audiobook for amusing narration that doesn’t require (or provoke) too much thought.

What I particularly disliked was a section towards the end that seemed like a stream of consciousness discourse on the topic of whether or not she should have another child (she eventually did, Wikipedia says). I realize that motherhood is a life-altering event, and work-life balance, the biological clock, and childcare are all major issues for working women. However, as someone who cannot relate (and honestly, was just there for the comedy), this seemed like an almost awkwardly personal commentary. I would suggest just skipping it if you can.

The Sellout, a sell out

This is a review of The Sellout by Paul Beatty.

The novel is a political satire that can come off as a disturbing and disparaging reflection of the society. It’s about a black man, identified only as ‘Me’ or ‘The Sellout’, who is amused and angry with the American society for pretending not to be racist, and for forcing integration that many apparently would rather not be a part of. It hence provides a sharp reflection of the American society that has failed to become a society of equals.

His father, who home schooled him through unorthodox sociological and psychological conditioning methods, is killed in a police shootout. Soon after, his city, Dickens, is struck out of maps and left unidentified. Aghast, he tries to reclaim the identity of the city and figure his own identity out in the process. So, first, he goes about painting a rough boundary across the region to mark his city. Also, Hominy, a friend and a former side actor in TV shows, surrenders himself to Me as a slave (because “true freedom includes the right to be a slave”)! The Sellout then segregates his girlfriend’s bus, with a “whites only” sign. When he does it, the number of fights and complaints, typical to the bus, falls drastically. And what’s more, people try to reproduce such segregation in other parts of the ‘city’. Crime rates drop and people are nicer. Even the city’s elementary school is segregated with the help of Me and Hominy the Slave, leading to better performance of the students.

Eventually the State catches on, and a case is filed against Me. The case is escalated to the Supreme Court, where the Judge asks, finally, “whether a violation of civil rights law that results in the very same achievement these heretofore mentioned statutes were meant to promote, yet have failed to achieve, is in fact a breach of said civil rights.” This is the crux of the book. Is forced integration, which is mostly pointless and often debases a man, the right thing to do? Is it not better to not enforce integration if that’s what the people concerned want? Or as Hominy asks, “are we missing the forest for the trees”?

This review may make The Sellout seem like it’s a serious and highly political novel. But it’s also hilarious. At many instances, you’ll find yourself smiling at the genius. And you’ll be astounded by what is happening too. Beatty continuously disturbs, offends and jokes, through passages imbued with too much meaning to be called merely comedy.

My only real and major grouse with the book is that I didn’t follow some of the American popular culture references. The novel doesn’t really have a plot, but rides along just fine with the help of the biting humor. It also rolls like a speeding truck, from one crack of dry sarcasm to another, so it gives you little time to breathe between the lines.

Beatty incessantly pokes fun at literature, movies, etc., for selling out to the majoritarian views of the society. That made me wonder, now that The Sellout is as world famous and is being sold out at bookstores due to its apparent conformity to the majority of the buyers’ views, does that make this book a sellout too?

The final verdict: The Sellout is meant to be re-read till one is tired by the irony of the world one lives in.

4/5.

Here’s an excerpt (that I thought needs to be written in bold, underlined and italicized):

“What does that mean, I’m offended?”… “It’s not even an emotion. What does being offended say about how you feel?”… “If I ever were to be offended, I wouldn’t know what to do. If I’m sad, I cry. If I’m happy, I laugh. If I’m offended, what do I do, state in a clear and sober voice that I’m offended, then walk away in a huff so I can write a letter to the mayor?”

To Tinder, or not to Tinder?

This is my review of Modern Romance, by Aziz Ansari.

This book is basically Freakonomics, but about dating and relationships. Also, Aziz Ansari is so cool. Anthropology tickles me because it forces me to look at social practices from a third person perspective; things I take for granted suddenly seem ridiculous (and pretentious, but that’s just me).

It asks questions that may or may not be interesting to you, like:

  • What’s the best way to seem attractive via text message?
  • How and why did online dating catch on?
  • How has the Information Age changed relationships?
  • What should my Tinder profile picture look like?!

Honestly, these aren’t things I’ve ever thought about. But what appealed to me was his scientific approach to a decidedly unscientific process. The evolution (and lack of evolution, at times) of social norms over generations never fails to amaze me. Online dating started out as a practice that was looked down upon, but in a matter of decades went mainstream.

3.5/5 from me. Take a look if you’re a light-nonfiction fan.

Coming Up for Air

This is a review of Coming Up for Air, by George Orwell.

832138-_uy200_On the book cover, a reviewer comments about how this is possibly the prequel to Animal Farm and 1984. It thus proves that most book jacket reviews are misguiding. At least, I didn’t see any of the depth that characterised the aforementioned books. Heck, I didn’t see the main theme of Animal Farm or 1984 in this book. Nevertheless, Coming Up for Air holds its own.

Coming Up for Air slips dangerously into being a comedy. On Goodreads it is described as a comedy. I’m not sure all readers will agree.

The book also tries to be a journal of an awfully bored and pensive man, George Bowling. It is set in the late 1930s in England, a time when everyone expected war and large scale poverty.

The constant theme is a lamentation of change that seems to have been constant. Bowling immerses himself into warm nostalgia about fishing and a quietness that defined villages back in the day, before the war. The Boer wars, Bowling believes, will repeat itself in some form in the years to come; and that the post-war losses and darkness in the future will be the same as after the Boer wars.

As predicted, England announces war. Bowling sees bombers flying over him, and is overwhelmed into revisiting his past. When he goes back to his village to escape what he sees as inevitable, he realises that the village is no more the same. Everything he remembers about it has changed beyond recognition. A void is created in him, which is further widened by his family and the society he lives in.

Despite the overall dullness of the storyline, it does not predict dystopia (unlike the more famous Orwell books). But it drops many hints on why war is an abomination. It is also one of those books that does not help you to relate to, or to feel any kind of affection towards the protagonist, and despite that, it makes you wonder if he will be okay.

The book is lively with respect to the imagery it conjures up. Sometimes it makes you shake your head at the wry and subtle humour, especially when Bowling describes the society and his family.

In sum, it’s a good read on a long weekend if it’s raining and you have nothing else to do. This Orwell book is also recommended if you like fishing. George Bowling loves fishing. So much so that it made me wonder if it was a metaphor for something more significant. Did I miss something here?

2/5